Friday, September 16, 2016

I ran across this and thought it was funny.  It says he was convicted in 1979.  I'm pretty sure that was in 1971....

Manson Family Member Tex Watson To Be Granted Parole At Age 70

20 comments:

katie8753 said...

They hauled Susan out in a pine box. I sincerely doubt they would let Tex out because of "health issues". LOL.

beauders said...

Lets hope he's terminal.

grimtraveller said...

I don't know how the situation runs in various American states, particularly in California since Susan Atkins' death but over here in the UK it's not unheard of for an inmate to be released on compassionate grounds, especially if they have a terminal illness. The train robber Ronald Biggs who, 15 months into a 30 year sentence, escaped and fled to Brazil {via Australia}, was eventually returned here after around 35 years on the run. A few years later he got really ill and was eventually released on compassionate grounds {he died a few years later}. The Scottish government released the Lockerbie aircraft bomber Abdelbaset Al-Megrahi on compassionate grounds from a life sentence {this is a guy found guilty of the murders of 270 people} when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

beauders said...

Lets hope he's terminal

Given that he's coming up for 71, given that his crimes were 47 years ago and given that he's going to die soon ~ ish anyway , as are all of us, what difference does it make if he has a terminal illness or not ? Or more to the point, why would you hope his illness is of the terminal variety ?
The argument that he doesn't deserve to live is somewhat moot by this point. He got caught and was punished, was reprieved from death through no doing of his own, has spent at least 38 years saying he deserved his death sentence. Truth is he has been alive for the "best" years of his life ~ such as they have been, banged up in prison. What he did can't be undone and it's by no means unusual for people to die at the age of 70, terminal illness or not. So what's to be gained by Charles Watson being terminal at this moment in time ?

Marliese said...

Hi Katie and Beauders,...you're right, stupid funny. Associated News Media is the same fake news site that reported Casey Anthony had gotten a license to operate a day care center. People will believe and argue anything...even a hoax. And this isn't even good hoax! Sick or not, Tex Watson will get out of prison the same way Susan Atkins got out of prison.

katie8753 said...

Hi Beauders! Hi Marliese! Casey Anthony operating a day care center. ROFL!!!!

Dilligaf said...


Grim, you say that Watson received his sentence and was punished, which implies that you believe that his punishment has been completed, however, it has not. A life sentence, even with parole, allows for a sentences to be served up to their death. That is where Watson finds himself. To release someone just because they age is not justice, for no one can avoid aging. If anything, early release is a reward for growing old, nothing more. I have seen many elderly inmates who were as evil, dishonest, or criminally oriented as they aged, still posing both a risk, as well as a disregard for society. Aged murderers do not deserve a break for simply growing old, they deserve to experience everything that comes with dying while incarcerated...

grimtraveller said...

Dilligaf said...


Grim, you say that Watson received his sentence and was punished, which implies that you believe that his punishment has been completed

I don't.
His punishment is an on going thing, which is the nature of a life sentence. It goes on. Perhaps I should have said "he was given a punishment for his crimes" but for me "he was punished" works out as the same thing. My point was that whether he "deserves to live" or not is kind of irrelevant and that he did not get away with his crimes. Sometimes, people seem to imply that somehow he got away with 8 murders when actually, just because he didn't die in the gas chamber, he did not.

To release someone just because they age is not justice, for no one can avoid aging

I agree. I think the idea of releasing a criminal just because they are old is ludicrous. I never argued for his release on any grounds. I just pointed out that it is not unheard of over here for inmates to be released on compassionate grounds. I still however, question the desire for him to be terminally ill at 70+. For most of us 70+ is a downhill slide even without the terminals !

If anything, early release is a reward for growing old, nothing more

That could be read that way if his age was the reason for release. But tell me, do inmates actually get released just for ageing ? The two criminals I mentioned earlier were released on compassionate grounds and I didn't agree with either being released and you know what a big softy I am.

I have seen many elderly inmates who were as evil, dishonest, or criminally oriented as they aged, still posing both a risk, as well as a disregard for society

Couldn't agree more. I concur with that because it's no different for non inmates. Some of the bitterest & most dishonest people and criminal viewpoints I've come across have been from elderly people. It almost goes without saying that the older one gets, the harder uncorrected attitudes get. I spent 8 years visiting people in an elderly home and the bile and vitriol that regularly poured forth could have lit many a bonfire !

Aged murderers do not deserve a break for simply growing old, they deserve to experience everything that comes with dying while incarcerated...

I suspect that when one is dying, one's location makes less of a difference than many of us think.....

katie8753 said...

Grim sounds like Dr. Cooper.

grimtraveller said...

Is that Timothy, John.P, Sarah or Elena ?

grimtraveller said...

The western world has an abundance of Dr Coopers.

maudes harold said...

Grim said:

“I suspect that when one is dying, one's location makes less of a difference than many of us think.....”


Oh dang Grim, I couldn’t disagree with you more on that. After not being with my mom when she died in a hospital, to being able to be with my “2nd Mom”, at her home, surrounded by all of her loved ones as she took her last breath, to hoping I could do that for my dad and then him dying alone in a strange place, surrounded by no one he knew, I couldn’t disagree with you more. Obviously major personal bias here.


But aside from my personal experience, I couldn’t imagine anyone thinking it wouldn’t matter much between dying in jail or at home surrounded by people who love you, for their comfort as well as yours.

katie8753 said...

Grim, I was referring to Dr. Sheldon Cooper on The Big Bang Theory. Otherwise known as "Shelly" by him mom. LOL.

katie8753 said...

Maude good to see you. My thoughts and prayers are with you regarding the loss of your Dad.

I agree, it matters greatly if you die in a cold, austere environment of a prison system, or surrounded by loved ones.

But given that the victims in this case died horrific deaths, surrounded only by blood thirsty killers, only accentuates the fact that the killers never see the light of day outside prison walls is justice served!!

katie8753 said...

Oops, not "him mom", "his mom".

katie8753 said...

Charlie talked a lot about the "Green Room". They won't have to see the "Green Room" because California decided to turn left, but whatever color the room is, it will be cold, lighted in fluorescent lights, and include a lot of "white noise" in prison.

beauders said...

Grim, I have a hard time having compassion for a man who murdered a pregnant woman fourteen days before her due date. Besides from the fact Watson is a Christian and if the next life is Christian then his death will be a good thing because he will be freed from his sins from this life. Of course I am a big softy too and after seeing Atkins wheeled in on a stretcher, unconscious, with very little life left in her, I would have probably let her go home to her family. I do believe in compassion and forgiveness.

Dilligaf said...

Beauders,

Compassion is n extremely important component of Justice, however, one must be careful in setting a precedent that could come back and bite. Atkins was not the first to expire while in custody, and she certainly will not be the last. I am okay with that. An added aspect to the Atkins decision was certainly the court of public opinion. Politically, it would be hard to grant her a release when her victims received none. Society is just not that forgiving, and no politician wants to be the one to buck that.

grimtraveller said...

maudes harold said...

I couldn’t imagine anyone thinking it wouldn’t matter much between dying in jail or at home

I could !

surrounded by people who love you, for their comfort as well as yours

I think that sentence is the wheel upon which this matter turns. Probably most of us when examining the issue will do so from our specific and unique point of view, the significant caveat being that most of us haven't yet had to face the real prospect of an impending death. We all know we're going to die one day, but it's usually "one day."
I wasn't saying that people wouldn't care where they died, rather, what I was getting at is that the real prospect of a death that could actually occur at any moment strikes me as a great leveller. And different people will approach that in vastly different ways. I was really responding to Diligaf's point that prisoners on a life sentence, as he put it, "deserve to experience everything that comes with dying while incarcerated." I suspect that if some have been in prison for 47 years and they have some condition that they will die from soon, or even if they're just plain ancient and the body is about to grace the stage for the final act, there isn't really anywhere they have as an option to go to; they are in the place they've been in for the lion's share of their life. At the same time, facing death for many people is a terrifying experience and it may remain that way, regardless of their location.
By the same token, being surrounded by those you love at home or the hospital or the hospice may not be the comforting episode we imagine it should be for everyone. It may well be for many. It won't be for all. One never knows exactly what goes on in someone else's head at various times of stress and for some people, dying isn't a fate to be trifled with. It's an unknown quantity that's a bit too unknown.

grimtraveller said...

beauders said...

I have a hard time having compassion for a man who murdered a pregnant woman fourteen days before her due date

I have a hard time having compassion for people that have done a lot less than that ! Compassion for a murderer and forgiveness are not qualities that spring up naturally in a human being most of the time. As a Christian, I forgive because I know I have to. Most of the time, real forgiveness has been difficult for me. My natural inclination is anything but compassion and forgiveness. For me at least, the beauty of God's impact on my being is that he gives me what I need to reach beyond my natural inclinations. It's not easy and believe me, if was still in that place where I did not believe that there was a God, much less be following that God {or trying to}, while I might not go for the death penalty, I'd have no problems with murderers suffering horrendously.
There is easy forgiveness and compassion and there is the more difficult, costly variety !

Besides from the fact Watson is a Christian and if the next life is Christian then his death will be a good thing because he will be freed from his sins from this life

God is in the business of freeing those that are willing from their sins in this life. Sins are primarily an affront to God so it's better that one deals with that before all else. I think that most people that detest Charles Watson do so at least partly because he has been open about saying that God has forgiven him for what he did. Now, that doesn't by any stretch of the imagination mean that one such as he escapes the civil penalties due his crime {and he hasn't}. But it does mean that regardless of the penalties he faces, God hasn't abandoned him.
Charles Manson has frequently stated that though in jail, he's free, certainly much freer than those on the outside. Well, if Tex has been genuine these last 41 or so years about Christ, he's been free, double plus. Real faith in God's ability and willingness to get one through this life to the one to come goes a long way towards putting whatever situation we find ourselves in in context.
I also think many people go for Tex's jugular regarding Shorty, while never saying a single word about bringing Bill Vance or Larry Jones to justice for their supposed part in the same murder.

seeing Atkins wheeled in on a stretcher, unconscious, with very little life left in her, I would have probably let her go home to her family

I thought it interesting that Vince Bugliosi who thought Atkins was a vile shitbag murderess {even though his book proves she didn't kill by her own hand} thought she should be allowed to do so, after being adamant that she should die. Even when she was helping the prosecution, he was not happy that she was going to escape the death penalty.

Sharolee said...

When Susan died they didn't have the elderly rule for parole, they weren't trying to save money and they weren't working to lessen the prison population. But if you think that Tex will rot to death in cell from Alzheimer's, think again...the prison isn't staffed to deal with changing adult diapers or spoon feeding old men. The advanced stages usually requires 24 nursing care which prisons don't provide either.