Thursday, May 26, 2011

All 50 states got a wake-up call this week when the Supreme Court ordered California to aggressively reduce its prison overcrowding. By Michael Doyle; McClatchy Newspapers - 5/24/11 2:43
WASHINGTON — All 50 states got a wake-up call this week when the Supreme Court ordered California to aggressively reduce its prison overcrowding. The court's decision will make it easier for judges to shrink prison populations elsewhere. It also could embolden other challenges to prison conditions well beyond California.
The pair of California cases commonly known as Brown v. Plata dated to a 1990 lawsuit filed by inmates who said mental health care had suffered as a result of overcrowded prisons. A three-judge panel agreed and ordered the state to reduce its prison population to about 110,000, which is 137.5 percent of the prisons' design capacity.
Corcoran State Prison in California's San Joaquin Valley, for instance, is home to infamous characters such as Charles Manson and has a design capacity of 3,116 inmates. It housed 4,900 as of April, 157 percent of its design capacity. Other California facilities, including Mule Creek State Prison near Sacramento and the Deuel Vocational Institution near Stockton, housed twice as many inmates in April as they were built for, state records show. California needs to reduce its overall prison population by roughly 30,000 to meet the target the three-judge panel imposed.  Thanks Mary!

79 comments:

katie8753 said...

Marliese said on a previous thread regarding this subject:

>>>It's being reported they will be transferring, not releasing, non violent and other low level offenders to local and county jails. No one convicted of a violent crime will be released or transferred to ease crowding, not even on compassionate grounds.>>>

As such, I don't think they'll be releasing any of the Manson killers as a result of this lessening of overcrowded prisons decision.

Question for any of you Californians. I was just curious as to when California's economy started declining to the point it is now, and what was the cause?

Ken619 said...

It started in 2008. It started about the exact same time the politicians were getting ready for the presidential elections. We were not in an actual recession at the time but the media was claiming we were. I feel it was a media hyped recession to create a negative effect on the over all opinion of the conservative parties. By doing so, it helped the "Hope" campaign. Historically, everytime we are in a major military conflict, it causes the economy to dip. The media played on this and had a devastating effect on CA and the nation. If CA goes down it hurts the rest of the country.


California at on point was the 7th largest economy in the world. This was during Reagan's term as Gov. thru Gov. Wilson's term. After Gov. Davis and the left took over, the state has been in decline ever since.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Ken said>>>>
"It started in 2008. It started about the exact same time the politicians were getting ready for the presidential elections. We were not in an actual recession at the time but the media was claiming we were. I feel it was a media hyped recession"...<<<<

Very interesting point Ken.
Admittedly, I don't follow politics closely, so I won't venture too deep into that area, myself.
Although, others better-equipped (on politics), are more than welcome to expound...

But, I will say this:
I do agree, that the media can fuel, extend, and worsen a recession.
Perception is half of reality.
If you tell folks they're in a recession... spending and investment slows, and becomes very cautionary.
When spending, investment, and entreprenourship slows... money stops changing hands... and you've fueled the variables which formulate recession.
Bottom line:
When the word "recession" is repeated over and over in the media... it worsens the economy even more... because folks tighten their belt, and stop spending even more.
In the initial stages... this can make the difference between "almost recession"... and "full-blown recession".
Confident investors, businessman, and consumers fuel a healthy economy.
The media can really damage that confidence.

That's my two cents.
How closely those ecnonmic "tenets" are tied to politics... I have no idea.
But, it wouldn't surprise me in the last, if those tactics were/are used for political purposes... as you suggest.

Thanks Ken.

katie8753 said...

Thanks Ken. That's what I was thinking that it has declined sharply in the last few years.

Weren't they talking about releasing prisoners due to the economy and they couldn't afford to house and feed all these prisoners a year or so ago? If so, were any released? I don't recall.

Ken619 said...

On another note, the housing bubble put the clencher on the whole deal. Foolish people were paying as much as $750,000 for homes that are now worth $150,000. Unbelievable!

Ken619 said...

katie8753 said...

Weren't they talking about releasing prisoners due to the economy and they couldn't afford to house and feed all these prisoners a year or so ago? If so, were any released? I don't recall.

They're just moving them to lesser type prisons. They're not really being released.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Ken said>>>>
"On another note, the housing bubble put the clencher on the whole deal. Foolish people were paying as much as $750,000 for homes that are now worth $150,000. Unbelievable!"

Absolutely correct Ken... and the word "clencher" couldn't be more accurate.
The health of the housing market, is the closest thing to gold standard, one can find, when determining the health of an economy.
As my dad used to say:
"A home is the biggest investment the average man will make in a lifetime".
When the housing market gets ridiculous... bad things are dead-ahead.
Homes are BIG price-tag items... which involve the income, and jobs, of both spouses.
Once the realty market shits the bed... you're economy is done.

Marliese said...

Hi Katie, Some of what we hear over and over again has to do with complicated, super strict regulations making it too difficult and expensive for small and medium businesses to operate here, along with the high taxes, so they go elsewhere...like to Texas and Arizona. Then there is the fat, left leaning government that will not cut...you can't create a budget based on a projected income of 140 or 150 billion dollars when the reality is that only 100 billion is coming in. They thought the double digit housing inflation would continue on and on forever I guess. Then, politically incorrect to say I suppose, the anywhere from ten to twenty billion dollar a year, depending what you believe, drain on the ecomomy from illegals. So that's just a tiny start, i'm sure it's much more complex with many more interwoven factors.Interesting question, Katie.

Ken619 said...

Don't even get me started on the whole illegal thing. It drives me NUTS! I don't even understand how the problems it has caused were allowed to happen!

katie8753 said...

>>>Ken said: They're just moving them to lesser type prisons. They're not really being released.>>>

Okay thanks Ken. I couldn't remember the outcome of that situation.

The housing bubble hit hard in a lot of states, but I know it hit California really hard. It's my understanding that in the 80's anyway, housing in Southern CA was outta site!! San Diego, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica. Probably in Northern CA too. San Francisco? Course I don't live there, I just talk to people. LOL.

katie8753 said...

Hi Marliese. I know there's not a simple answer to that question. So many factors involved that are interwoven into the current situation.

I think the wages are higher in CA than here, but the housing and cost of living is more expensive there, or it was.

In the 1990's, you could buy a nice 2500 square foot brick home here in a new neighborhood for $150,000. In CA, from what I was reading, the same house went for $400,000 and up.

Texas is having its own budget troubles now too, but in Texas, instead of letting prisoners go, they plan to kick old ladies out of nursing homes to save money! HA HA.

Just kidding. I think they finally resolved all that budget stuff here last night at midnight. (Don't they always do it at midnight???)

katie8753 said...

>>>Ken said: Don't even get me started on the whole illegal thing. It drives me NUTS! I don't even understand how the problems it has caused were allowed to happen!>>>

Okay I won't get into it. It's a sore subject here too!!! We're both border states. I don't understand any of that either. :)

Marliese said...

A huge component in that 'foolish' person buying a 750,000 dollar house were the predatory lenders! People knew they didn't qualify and couldn't afford to buy that house, but the lenders got creative and said 'oh sure you can, we'll make sure you qualify, we'll get you in a house.' Crummy credit history, borrowed money down, sneaky adjustable rate mortgages etc. etc People that had no business buying a house were given mortgages they couldn't afford and couldn't sustain. The 'American Dream' that certain politicians supported backfired big time. And everyone pays now. And I hear you Ken, on the illegals.

katie8753 said...

>>>Marliese said: A huge component in that 'foolish' person buying a 750,000 dollar house were the predatory lenders!>>>

Yes indeed. The bottom line with this problem is that old five letter word: G-R-E-E-D!

People who didn't have any business getting into a 30 year ARM Mortgage just lost their asses. I'm sure it wasn't fully explained to them what that meant.

Then we had to bail the greedy the banks out. GRRRR. I won't start on that!!! HA HA.

Ken619 said...

That image Lynyrd posted of the illegals is pretty much their mind set. I'm in the construction industry and I learned very quick that that was the type of people you were dealing with. Now, I will admit that one of my best friends from work was here illegal at one time. The difference with him was that he came here for a better life and adapted to American culture. He himself is disgusted by their behavior and tries to disassociate himself from them. In general, I've found this not to be the case though. F... you and take without worrying about the consequences has been what I've seen from their behavior. What gets me is the private citizen is powerless in doing anything about it.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

The sad thing... is that the sensible person, who works hard... counts and saves his pennies... and then makes reponsible purchases, based on their income... living within their means (even if it hurts a little bit)... always ends-up paying for the excesses of others.

I consider myself in that category.
I get-up every day... go to work, and live well within my means.
But now... I'm suffering along with everyone else, 'cuz many folks were living on plastic and credit... way beyond their means.
Irresponsibility... plain and simple.
American's have an... "I want it NOW" attitude... whether they can afford it or not.
It's an en-titled, irresponsible attitude.
This may sound completely archaic... but, if we were still paying cash for everything... and credit didn't exist... we wouldn't be in this mess.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Hi Marliese!

Marliese said>>>>
"A huge component in that 'foolish' person buying a 750,000 dollar house were the predatory lenders!"<<<<

There's no doubt at all, that the lenders had a BIG hand in this mess... and that they were indeed predatory.
They were definitely irresponsible, and lending sums of money, that should NOT have been lent.
AND, they were lending the money to folks, to purchase houses... that weren't worth HALF of what the borrowers were using the money for (As Ken said).
Lending $750K, for homes that were worth $150K... is NEVER a good idea.

I agree with all that Marliese.
But, having said all that... I have to very respectfully disagree with you.
At the end of the day... you can't force someone to borrow money.
You can't make a responsible person, bite-off more (financially) than they can chew.
Everyone knows what they can realistically afford, based on their income.
As you said yourself:
"People knew they didn't qualify and couldn't afford to buy that house".

The lenders definitely encouraged folks to act irresponsibly... but when you get down to brass tacks... it's the borrower who signs on the dotted line.
The lenders encouraged irresponsibility... but, it was the borrowers, who made the final, and critical, irresponsible act.
I mean, let's face it... folks try to sell us stuff we can't afford every day.
We can't allow a lender, or car salesman, to decide for us what we can, or can't afford.
We'll surely end-up in the doghouse every time.
No one is (or should be), more concerned about our own financial well-being than we are, for ourselves.
Ultimately, we're responsible for our own purchase decisions.
BTW folks... DON'T go on a car salesman's lot, if you value your sanity! LOL

The final link in the chain is the borrower, and forced to choose a culprit to pin the blame on... I'd go with the borrower predominantly... but, that's just me.

I'd say... lender 30% responsible... borrower 70% responsible. LOLOL

Peace... Lynyrd

katie8753 said...

Is it just me, or is anyone else thinking "WHO CARES" if the prisoners are uncomfortable! Prison isn't supposed to be fun. That's why they call it prison.

I think they should all go back to eating bread and water, making license plates, building roads and picking up trash. Then they'd be too tired to whine!!

"Shakin' them bushes boss". HA HA.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

I really have zero knowledge of the "illegals" subject.
I live in Massachusetts.
We're so far from any borders (well excpet Canada, which is basically America)... that I have no contact with illegals.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

But Katie... they're over-crowded.
That's cruel and unusual.
It's bad for morale, and mental health.
Sometimes Tex has to wait up to a week, to check-out his favorite religious book, from the prison library... LOLOL

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Sometimes the bathroom, out by the Rec room, gets backed-up 10-12 guys deep. LOL
(Much like a concert, or major sports event)
: )

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Believe me... an over-crowded men's room, can get both cruel and unusual! LOLOL

katie8753 said...

I think prison should be like the old days. A cot hanging off the wall supported by chains and a sink. The prisoners should be fed on a rusty tray that's slipped under the door, maybe twice a day. If they want water, they can have a tin cup and fill it from the sink.

Now if we have to multiply that by 40 guys per cell....so be it!

That'll learn 'em. LOL.

katie8753 said...

Hey Marliese, speaking of baby killers, whatever happened to ole Scott Peterson? Do you know which prison he's in?

Marliese said...

You're right, Lynyrd of course.

I do agree with what what you're saying, it's just the very term 'predatory' means to me that some lenders preyed on the unsuspecting, on the people that knew they couldn't afford it and wouldn't qualify, and deceived them. They made obscene amounts of money off these people and these loans. And in many instances, the government backed them. Who doesn't want to own their own home, especially when they have a couple of kids, living in an apt. or a rental house for years, never getting ahead, and then here comes someone they trust, an expert they honestly believe wouldn't mislead them, that tells them oh, the house is worth 200 now, we'll get you in there and the way it's been going, it'll be worth 400 before you know it, with the equity you can refinance and get into a fixed rate loan. Some borrowers let their guard down, they believed what they were being told. After all, the lenders were in the business. The sub-prime rock star lenders deceived people. They preyed on the poor, on people with no money managing skills, on people that did not understand the fine print and on the elderly...with those reverse mortgages. Pure greed. Then there's the appraisers...they knew what they were doing was wrong, but they lied and did it anyway.

I absolutely blame the borrowers, but I blame the lenders that made it possible even more. Borrowers were told no for years, now all of a sudden they're being told yes. They didn't have to show the slightest comprehension of the mortgages they were signing on to either. That's not how we would have been, so i do have mixed feelings about it...they had a responsibility to understand the fine print. But I believe the lenders share equally in the blame. Many of them gained so much in the process. It should never have happened. Back before this, borrowers had to qualify. Period. They had to have job stability...years worth. And couldn't go into debt for the down payment. And no one lied, cheated or fudged numbers to make them qualify either. And borrowers knew exactly what they were signing. Just like their prents before them.

You mentioned car salesmen and it reminded me of something that used to really bother me. I never understood when people with a little equity in their homes would refinance and take huge amounts of cash out of the house to buy cars and toys, instead of just sitting on it and waiting out the market. So now they're paying that car off for thirty years! That makes absolutely no sense to me. Then the house loses equity! They'd be fine if they'd resisted, if that equity hadn't burned a hole in their pockets. They had to have that road hogging new Suburban, the trips, and the new kitchen though. Some people refinanced so many times and took out so much cash for cars and toys and just general living beyond their means that when the equity began hemorrhaging out of the place, they finally owed way more than the house was worth, and they were upside down. So then they have to go into a high risk loan and pay a higher interest rate! And many times, lose it altogether. I blame those people for sure. 100%.

I know someone that took money out of their house to make the payroll during a down time in work for their small business, so their workers would get paid. Then the work dried up altogether. They lost the business and the house. I'd never have done it, but they were desperate. Sometimes things aren't always as black and white as they seem, so who's to say...you know?

Marliese said...

Hi Katie, i don't know! I'm thinking San Quentin? Right there above the bay where he dumped his wife and baby.

katie8753 said...

Marliese and Lynyrd: I agree with both of you. But I think it was more 50/50. I think the banks and loan recipients are at fault.

I definitely think that banks were making loans to people who were unqualified to be receiving such large amounts in order to make a buck.

I don't think we should have bailed them out. But...it was being forced down our throats that the "economy would collapse" if the banks fail.

Well we bailed the banks out, and I can't see any different operating procedures now than then.

For instance, my younger son is 19 years old, finally just got a little job working at Six Flags, making minimum wage, and he gets about 6 letters a day from banks trying to get him to take out a credit card.

I shred all those before he even sees them. That would be a disaster for him.

But that's just one young man. Multiply that by 1,000,000 young men in this country, and all I can say is the banks haven't learned anything.

What 19 year old college student needs a credit card with a $5000 limit??? Not one that I can think of.

I just hope these young couples, et al, who lost their homes will wise up and think twice before taking out large loans again. In this economy, you can't even count on a job anymore. Here today...gone tomorrow!!!

katie8753 said...

Marliese, the only thing I've read about Scott Peterson is that he was sent to San Quentin and he used to have a room by the bay and they moved him to a room overlooking the workout yard.

Good enough for him.

I think it will be another 20 years or so before he's executed.

What a waste of money to the CA taxpayers to keep him alive.

Tsk, tsk.

katie8753 said...

I've often said, if Tex Watson had been tried here in Texas, he would have been dead long ago, and wouldn't be a burden on CA.

MrPoirot said...

Ken619 said...
It started in 2008. It started about the exact same time the politicians were getting ready for the presidential elections. We were not in an actual recession at the time but the media was claiming we were. I feel it was a media hyped recession to create a negative effect on the over all opinion of the conservative parties. By doing so, it helped the "Hope" campaign. Historically, everytime we are in a major military conflict, it causes the economy to dip. The media played on this and had a devastating effect on CA and the nation. If CA goes down it hurts the rest of the country.


Mr Poirot replies:

Ever heard of the October Surprise? It's a last minute bad news bomb that democrats drop on their own country in every presidential election. The "October Surprise" of the 2008 election was Bernie Madoff's $65Bil Ponzi scheme. It was Bernie's big theft that started the mortgage market collapse and the current recession. Ripples and waves from Bernie have now put the entire Western world into recession.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Hi Marliese!

The lenders were granting loans to make a buck, with no regard for the consequences.
There's no doubt about that.
I'm not sure what the answer to that scenario is.
Hopefully, lenders (and borrowers) have learned their lesson, as to where that road leads.
Unfortunately, as time passes, history always seems to repeat itself.

In yesteryear... borrowers could "bank" (pun intended, LOL), on the lenders exercising integrity.
That honesty definitely disappeared somewhere along the line.

It seems the only solution, is to have some type of government-mandated supervision of these bank transactions.
I cringe to say that... but, relying on good old fashioned integrity, evidently failed us.

The other thing that I experienced as well... was this:
The banks were lending folks too much money... but, a whole slew of "private mortgage companies" cropped-up in my area.
The "private mortgage companies", would undercut the major banks interest rate 1/2% every time... and also loan you another 20-30 thousand, above the major bank's decision.
This undercutting of rates, and approving higher loans, was their bread-and-butter for competing with the "big guys".
These crazy "private" mortgage loans, were often "sold" a couple years into the person's payments.
You started-off making your payments locally... and end-up sending your payments to East Calimer Butt-Frost Dakota.
It just got so ugly, all the way around.
And as Ken suggested initially... the homes weren't even worth what folks were paying.

Also... I do feel very bad any time the elderly are taken-advantage of... in any way.
You gotta be a certain type of slime, to deceive an elderly person.

If you go on a car lot... they'll still try to sell you the most expensiove car on the lot.
It never ends.

All I can say is "buyer beware".

I agree whole-heartedly with your opinion, regarding taking-out loans against the house.
It's not something I would ever recommend.
If you can't afford something "in addition to the house"... you probably shouldn't add it to your house bill! LOLOL

Peace... Lynyrd.

I'll go 60-40... but that's my final offer. : )
(Just Kidding)

Marliese... I can see you're going to be fun debating, on many subjects!
You Rock!! LOLOL

katie8753 said...

>>>Lynyrd said: The lenders were granting loans to make a buck, with no regard for the consequences.
There's no doubt about that.
I'm not sure what the answer to that scenario is.>>>

They still are. The banks send letters to millions of people every day, offering credit cards with 0% interest for 12 months. BUT...if that credit card holder misses ONE payment, or is late by one day, the interest goes up to the current APR, which might be as high as 25% or 30%. Which means, every time they make a payment of $100, $80 goes to the interest and $20 to the balance. They're still scheming.

>>>It seems the only solution, is to have some type of government-mandated supervision of these bank transactions.
I cringe to say that... but, relying on good old fashioned integrity, evidently failed us.>>>

Obama tried that and made them send information to card holders in "clear concise information". And guess what? The credit card companies went up on the interest rate to make up for it.

>>>Also... I do feel very bad any time the elderly are taken-advantage of... in any way.
You gotta be a certain type of slime, to deceive an elderly person.>>>

That's sickening but true. The elderly are the biggest picked on targets yet. They don't understand things and they get boogied.

>>>All I can say is "buyer beware".>>>

Yes, Caveat Emptor. It's up to the buyer to be savvy to all these shenanigans, but unfortuntely, that's not the case.

Ergo, I place the blame on the banks!!

katie8753 said...

Mr. P: I won't be responding to your comment about Mr. Madoff because I'm not knowledgeable about Mr. Madoff's activities. I know he ripped a lot of people off, but I'm not sure how that contributed to the downfall of 2008.

So, I'm not ignoring you, just won't respond due to non-information. Hope that makes sense. :)

MrPoirot said...

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...
Hi Marliese!

The lenders were granting loans to make a buck, with no regard for the consequences.
There's no doubt about that.

Mr Poirot replies:

Ive read that too, a thousand times. It's a lie. Funny how these "bad loans" all went into default right when the Madoff scam hit.
It's considered antisemitic and politicallyt incorrect to place blame the actual perpetrators of the 2008 collapse. This is why you've read about those "bad loans" a thousand times.

Look at it this way: why didn't the democrats utilize the mortgage collapse as the October Surprise if the Madoff theft was so insignificant?

katie8753 said...

Okay everyone...I bid you all a good night!! 'til tomorrow!!

Marliese said...

Lynyrd, you're so fairminded, 60-40!
Btw, good old Bill Clinton wanted everyone to be able to buy a home. The Community Reinvestment something or other act was revised during his time in the mid nineties encouraging banks to reinvest in their local communities by lowering their standards for lending and providing home loans to low income borrowers...with fewer than the usual assurances that they could afford them. IOW, they were told to lighten up, support their neighbors and give them loans even if they knew they couldn't pay them back!

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Hi Poirot.

As Katie said... I'm not knowledgable enough about the subject of which you speak, to offer much discussion.

Ken's earlier comment regarding 2008, seems to correlate with what you're saying.
Maybe he can elaborate further.
If I understood Ken correctly, he was saying that the democrats were preaching recession (in the media) as a political move back in 2008... and it back-fired, pushing us from a semi-struggling economy... into a full-blown recession.
It sounds strikingly familiar to what you're saying Poirot... unless I'm misunderstanding one (or both) of you.

I agreed that the media can definitely "put a scare" into consumers, and create a "self-fulfilled" prophecy... sorta speak.
But, I also admitted, I knew little about the politicians involvement, except to say... "it wouldn't surprise me".

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Ya know what Marliese... for you... I'll go 50/50. LOLOL

What the heck...
I like even ratios anyway. : )

Marliese said...

You'll go 50-50! You're one of the good guys, lynyrd, you always keep it fair.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

I'm a sucker for a pretty avatar. : )

Marliese said...

Katie, my son too! He's a college student with a part time job, and opened a checking/savings bank account so he could get direct deposit and a debit card for his paycheck. All of a sudden now he's getting all kinds of mail offering credit cards with huge limits. I've been doing the same thing and throwing it all out.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Marliese... your passion is very convincing.
I've seen few bloggers put that much effort, and thought, into a debate.
You convinced me.
The lenders and banks suck!! LOLOL

Ken619 said...

Mr Poirot.....

"Look at it this way: why didn't the democrats utilize the mortgage collapse as the October Surprise if the Madoff theft was so insignificant?"

Madoff was in bed with three democratic politicians. Their names off the top of my head, not sure. One was on TV today. I remember them following the money trail and it pointed to these politicians. Dick Morris had done the commitary on it. I'll try to find out who they were tonight.

stella1971 said...

"I really have zero knowledge of the "illegals" subject.
I live in Massachusetts.
We're so far from any borders (well excpet Canada, which is basically America)... that I have no contact with illegals".

Now Lynyrd - I love all of my American neighbors, but we are not America... :)

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Good point Stella.

I just meant the culture (in Canada) is much the same as ours, and we don't have you guys loitering in front of Home Depot and Loew's, looking for work. LOL

St. Circumstance said...

And besides...

they already apologized for Brian Adams...

:)

stella1971 said...

You haven't seen me on a Wednesday afternoon at our local liquor store - bwahaha! I do know where you were coming from Lynyrd - I just couldn't help poking the fire.

Seriously though, in my day job I'm a university administrator and not the town drunk - I have that gig for the weekends.

LOVE you guys!

stella1971 said...

St. I also personally apologize for Nickelback, Celine Dion, Avril Lavigne and anything associated with David Foster. We are happy to take credit for Rush and Neil Young, however... :)

St. Circumstance said...

I have read in a few places I am the blog drunk, so maybe we will get along...

I love Neil Young- makes everything else worth it..

Ill take the Mackenzie Brothers as well :)

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Isn't Mike Myers of "Waynes World" fame from Canada??
That guy is a scream! LOL

Jim Carrey?
Another scream!!

Michael J Fox?
I'm not a big fan... but, isn't he sick with leukemia or something?

Stella... give us the inside "Canadian scoop"! LOL

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Yeah... Rush Rocks! LOL

Great hockey players as well.

My dad used to say... "those guys are born with ice skates on". LOL
(Yeah, he was a bit of an Archie Bunker... LOL).

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Saint said>>>>
"And besides...
they already apologized for Brian Adams"...

LMAO.
Good one as usual.

"Hello Laverne"...
AHahahaha

Pristash said...

Canada: Take Howie Mandel back!

And so I hear this morning on the radio that Lindsay Lohan will be allowed to serve her prison sentence at home...because she is a non-violent offender...benfitiing from the situation in California.

Pristash said...

spell much?

St. Circumstance said...

:) Pritash...

I swear I started to apologize for Lindsay lohan lol

Marliese said...

Well thanks lynyrd, like i said, i sincerely appreciate your fairness. I want you to know I'm not deliberately being obstinate, and can appreciate other points of view! It's just i dislike blaming the little guy instead of the people entrusted with the responsibility of protecting the soundness and health of the markets for all of us. You know, it's not like the people given sub-prime loans approved their own loan applications. And the greedy flippers have only themselves to blame, they knew better.
There was a realtor near us, older man, sold a lot of property for years, he actually sold my parents home for them, and a few years after that, he morphed into something no one recognized! i'm surprised he could even recognize himself in the mirror. He's now doing 14 years in a federal prison...right where he belongs, for illegal loan practices and misappropriation etc. People lost everything they'd ever worked for.

katie8753 said...

HI STELLA!!!! Good to see you.

Every time I see your name I think of that Marlon Brando movie.

"STELLLL-AHHH...STELLLL-AHHH"

HA HA.

>>>Circumstance said: I have read in a few places I am the blog drunk, so maybe we will get along...>>>

St. I think sometimes we share that dubious honor!! LOL.

katie8753 said...

>>>Pristash said: And so I hear this morning on the radio that Lindsay Lohan will be allowed to serve her prison sentence at home...because she is a non-violent offender...benfitiing from the situation in California.>>

Oh, poor Miss Lohan. She can't be expected to associate with the commoners in prison.

Reminds me of Debra LaFave. She was just too pretty to put in jail. :)

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Katie... the movie you're referencing is "A Streetcar Named Desire".

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

Circumstance... here's a video for ya.
It's about two nights in a row. LOL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__8fQh04tjo

katie8753 said...

>>>Lynyrd said: Katie... the movie you're referencing is "A Streetcar Named Desire".>>>

Yeah...that's the one!! Boy I sat thru that movie once and it's unendurable!!

Almost as bad as "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. LOL.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

You mean you didn't enjoy watching a poor, sweaty, guy in a "wife-beater", yelling at his wife for 2 hours Katie? LOLOL

katie8753 said...

"You mean you didn't enjoy watching a poor, sweaty, guy in a "wife-beater", yelling at his wife for 2 hours Katie? LOLOL"

The only thing I remember about that movie was him standing in the street yelling "Stella" and his bitch sister-in-law always talking about what a loser he is.

Just like Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Nothing but arguing and name calling. Both written by Tennessee Williams.

Boy that guy must have come from an EXTREMELY disfunctional family. LOL.

Marliese said...

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was on again recently after Elizabeth Taylor passed away. There is a lot of yelling, and that screeching high strung mother screaming Oh Big Daddy, no! But I love it.
Maggie and Brick. What is the victory of a cat on a hot tin roof, Maggie? Just stayin' on it I guess, long as she can.

LynyrdSkynyrdBand said...

You Rock Marliese!

katie8753 said...

"Hey there Big Daddy I'm Maggie the Cat!" HA HA.

Hey Marliese did you happen to catch Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

That movie was excrutiating. Bitchin' & drankin' all the time. I get the feeling that was what life what like for Liz & Dick in reality.

Although I have to admit, that's the best acting I've ever seen her do. Or maybe she wasn't acting! HA HA.

Marliese said...

I've watched pieces of it, Katie, but have never been able to get through it beginning to end.
I like her better in Butterfield 8. i was reading a biography of liz recently and she's quoted in it as saying she thought Butterfield 8 was crap, and that she deliberately behaved like a wild brat during production because she didn't want be there. It was during the worst of the eddie thing i guess. Then she ended up earning an Oscar for it.

katie8753 said...

I've read the biography of Liz. It's very interesting. She had quite a life!

I missed Butterfield 8. I'll have to look for that one on TCM.

I loved her in Giant and Elephant Walk too! :)

Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
katie8753 said...

Lynn I sure hope they don't have any computer glitches this time!

I can't believe a 17 year old girl is dead because somebody typed in the wrong name or something. Pathetic.

Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
katie8753 said...

Thanks Lynn. I'll check it out. Sorry for the loss of your friend's only child. What a waste of life!!

I hope you're doing okay!

Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
katie8753 said...

Lynn, I'm glad you're looking for a new kitty. You can't replace the old one, but you can certainly learn to love the new one!!

You have a great weekend too!!!

beauders said...

i remember the lily burk murder, wasn't james ellroy himself or a family member of his friendly with the burks?

Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.